How to Retire in Costa Rica: Expat Alexis Cress

How to Retire in Costa Rica – Expat Interview with Alexis Cress, Part II

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Alexis is certified to teach Vinyasa yoga, which she does 2-4 days a week in Costa Rica.

Many of you who read this blog are interested in, most often, how to retire in Costa Rica. Expat Alexis Cress hails originally from Minnesota, and she and her husband recently retired here to Costa Rica’s South Pacific coast. We met and talked in early January, and you can see Part I of this interview here. Part II, which follows, will share more from Alexis’s perspective about finding social connections, her love for teaching yoga, the surprises she’s found since moving to Costa Rica, and recommendations she makes to people looking at how to retire in Costa Rica.

Finding Social Connections as a New Expat in Costa Rica

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In Costa RIca, the Pura Vida life does allow you to catch plenty of sunsets.

JuliAnne: Alexis, retiring to Costa Rica means you’ve essentially left all your old friends back at home behind. A common complaint I hear often – especially from women – is that they have problems finding and making friends, once they are here. What’s your experience with that so far?

Alexis: I’m an introvert so I need to make myself get connected. So for me, I’m finally at the point – 18 months after we moved here full-time in June 2015 – when I have the chance to get connected because we’ve been so busy.  I think for introverts it can be a challenge here, because you can get isolated. And I think, you have to make an effort to go out. In rainy season, I don’t like to go out after a certain time due to the rain because the roads can be dangerous and visibility can be challenging.

JuliAnne: Your home is here on the side of the mountain, which offers beautiful views, but I imagine you have to plan your outings. It’s not like you are down the street from 7-11 or from the hardware store. You’re a good 20 minutes up the hillside from the town below, correct?

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Want to know how to retire in Costa RIca? Alexis and Leo did it in 2015.

Alexis: Yes. We chose to build on the edge of town, not in town, so that does have its own challenges.

JuliAnne: You don’t have a ton of neighbors from what I can see.

Alexis: Actually, we do have a handful, and we’ve become acquainted with all of them. Most of them also hail from Canada or the U.S., and we’ve gotten to know their Tico caretakers, as well. We all help each other out. I don’t ever feel isolated, really, because I know all these people are within arm’s reach if needed.

JuliAnne: What about making friends and social connections?

Alexis: I do a lot of stuff with women. There’s a ladies’ luncheon here in town every two weeks that I attend. Plus, I teach yoga two to four times a week, depending on the season. My hubby, however, is more of a homebody, so we don’t do out a lot of socializing outside our home as a couple.

Vinyasa Yoga Classes with a View in Ojochal, Costa Rica

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Alexis built her own yoga studio on their property in Costa Rica on the side of a mountain.

JuliAnne: Tell me more about your yoga practice. We’re sitting in this beautiful wood and steel pavilion here that you built on your property. It’s stunning with the views both the ocean and the rainforest. I can imagine it’s a really unique experience to practice up here.

Alexis: I taught a lot of yoga in the U.S. (I am a registered 200-hour yoga instructor.) I’m also certified in Mindfulness Meditation. I have taught yoga for three years now and I love it! I love teaching. I used to be a triathlete and a marathoner. I’m also certified in Yoga Sculpt. I’m really into fitness, so all of that has evolved into a way for me to share that passion with others – getting the meditation in, as well – plus it’s great for me in my own spiritual practice.

JuliAnne: Tell me more about the local yoga classes that you offer.

Alexis: I started initially at Bali Rica in August 2015 teaching one morning a week. Here, in my own studio, I teach yoga on Tuesday mornings. Everyone is welcome to come to my classes; they are designed for all levels. In the future, I’m thinking of offering some special events on special topics here in my open-air studio.

JuliAnne: What can one expect to pay for one of your yoga classes?

Alexis: If the class takes place here in my studio, the person may make a donation for the class. All that money goes to charity here in the community. For classes at Bali Rica, I offer packages for multiple classes, or a drop-in costs $10.

The Surprises Alexis found when she moved to Costa Rica

JuliAnne: The donation class is a great option for retirees on a fixed income or people that live on a budget. I like that. Alexis, there’s always a few things that can never be anticipated before one moves abroad. Since this is your first experience in that, tell me what was surprising about moving to this part of Costa Rica for you and Leo?

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Another shot of Alexis’ home yoga studio in Costa Rica with the sun setting behind.

Alexis: There have been a few surprises we weren’t prepared for, I’ll admit.

  • For starters, I miss the ability to go down to the corner store to get what I need; there’s a lot of planning that goes into living here. The grocery is 30 minutes away.
  • Also, the famed Pura Vida lifestyle. It’s been a big adjustment for us. A good one! But, I have had to learn how to “go with the flow” a lot more here than I did ever did back in Minnesota.
  • The starting over in establishing a girlfriend network can be tough. I miss my girlfriends back in Minnesota so much. Even though we didn’t see each other that often – just once a month probably – just knowing that I could see them if I needed to was comforting. That feeling is a lot different here than I anticipated.
  • I love to run outside. In Minnesota, I did that a lot. But here, with roads constructed of mountain rock that gets either very dusty or very muddy, that can be a challenge (at the minimum) or even dangerous (when they are slick). So, I miss that.

Three Recommendations for New Expats Moving to Costa Rica

JuliAnne: Thank you for sharing those things, Alexis. All of those are significant changes, most of which new expats never think about. Now that you and Leo are 18 months into your Costa Rica retirement, what three recommendations would you make to new expats considering such a move?

La Pura Vida Costa Rica lifestyle blog by author JuliAnne Murphy
Alexis is a former Certified Financial Planner who retired with her husband to Costa Rica’s South Pacific coast

Alexis: First, I would say rent for a long time. Some recommend that when you are new, you should rent for two years; I would say rent for at least a year, if you know the area you’re interested in. During that time period, you will find out what it’s really like to live there, and if it’s the place you think it will be.

That was what we were planning on doing, but I was itching to buy. We looked at so many homes around here and could not find what we wanted that it was discouraging. So then we started thinking about lots. When we found this lot where we’re sitting, we fell in love with it. But, that said, it would not have hurt to have waited a year.

JuliAnne: It’s a common to mistake to fall in love with an area and to move lock, stock and barrel and then discover you really didn’t know what you were getting into. What you said makes a ton of sense. What else?

Alexis: One really big surprise to us was the cost of living and how expensive it is to live in Costa Rica. We could not find a lot of research here on cost of living data before we moved. We’re spending a lot less on food here (though we’re not meat eaters; we eat vegetables, beans, rice, etc. so the cost of food is not so bad for us.) But all the car stuff – the car purchase, the car maintenance, the gas, the auto parts – living in the area with the dirt roads and the mud and the 4 x 4 and ongoing dangers plays into all of those ongoing bills in a big way.

JuliAnne: Agreed. The cost of personal transportation here in Costa Rica is much higher than in many other countries. Buying a car here by itself normally costs about double of what you would pay in Panama or Nicaragua because of the taxes alone.

Alexis: Third, I recommend that new people get join the community forums or Facebook pages for the area they are interested in and check in often to see what’s really happening. People are very honest, most of the time, in these forums, and you can learn a lot.

JuliAnne: A good idea, to be sure. Most future expats who contact me are always hoping to connect with more established expats to ask questions and so forth.

Alexis: Fourth, living in a rural area like here along the South Pacific coast, it’s really important to speak Spanish. If possible, learn as much as you can prior to your move. I am taking Spanish lessons now and beginning to get a feel for the language. This seems to be much more important along the coast than in the more developed areas around San Jose, the capitol.

JuliAnne: I don’t think enough can be said about the important of learning some Spanish before you relocate to or retire in Costa Rica. So many expats – especially those from the U.S. – come and assume they can make it and be happy without any language skills. This is simply very difficult to do.

Finding Happiness in Costa Rica

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Alexis is seated here on one of Costa Ballena’s gorgeous beaches. How does it get any better?

JuliAnne: On a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being very satisfied, how would you rate your happiness level at this point with your retirement in Costa Rica?

Alexis: I would say I’m at an 8 overall. Adjusting – as I described – is a big part of living here, especially at first. There are a lot of healing modalities and providers in Costa Rica (such as alternative medicine providers: acupuncture, massage, reiki, chiropractors, etc.) – especially in the Costa Ballena area that have been very helpful to me personally, as we’ve gotten settled. That has been a huge gift and has made the transition easier.

JuliAnne: Alexis, thank you again for your openness, your transparency and your willingness to share with me and the La Pura Vida Costa Rica readership about your move to Costa Rica and your experience so far. And, most of all, congratulations on your new home and your land! You’ve created a beautiful space here!

Alexis: Thank you, JuliAnne. We love our new space and all of the nature that goes with it – it’s gorgeous. We’re very happy with it. It was a pleasure to chat with you.

For more on Alexis, visit her website.

Want to keep abreast of future posts about my Costa Rica expat life?

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Why I chose Costa Rica: Meet Alexis Cress

How to Retire in Costa Rica: Meet Expat Alexis from Minnesota

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Alexis Cress is a former certified financial planner & coach who moved to Costa Rica

There we sat, the two of us, in cross-legged relaxation drinking cool green tea, having a conversation, as the midday breeze caressed our faces, fluffing our hair. Between sips of tea and our discussion about how to retire in Costa Rica, I found myself gazing out at the view of the Pacific Ocean in the distance and the kaleidoscope of greens visible in the adjacent forest.

Sounds lovely, doesn’t it? And indeed it was. This was a recent Tuesday, when Alexis Cress agreed to host me at her home yoga studio so that I could interview her for this first expat interview of 2017 for my La Pura Vida Costa Rica blog.

I met Alexis through her yoga teaching. She teaches an all-level Vinyasa Flow once a week down the street from my home on an open-air pavilion at a neighbor’s bed and breakfast. After several weeks, I realized that Alexis – who is around my age, in her late 40’s – had a story to tell about her sojourn to Costa Rica (which includes her husband) and some tips on their experience and how it might inform your choice on how to retire in Costa Rica – that might be interesting to you, my La Pura Vida Costa Rica readers. At my invitation, she agreed to speak with me.

So, first off, a very special thanks to Alexis Cress for her willingness to open her yoga studio to me (which was where we sat, pictured here), and for sharing her story.

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Alexis’ home studio overlooks the Pacific Ocean and the rainforest in Costa Rica

Editor note: As in all my expat interviews, I do my best to let you the reader hear as much as possible directly from the person with whom I spoke. Thus, the following will be a back and forth of the conversation Alexis and I had. (She has also had the opportunity to review this interview and to make any edits that she felt were appropriate.)

So, without further ado, meet Alexis Cress.

The Journey from Minnesota to Costa Rica

JuliAnne: Alexis, first off, where are you from?

Alexis: We moved to Costa Rica from Bloomington, Minnesota, which is a suburb of Minneapolis.

JuliAnne: Alexis, how did you discover Costa Rica?

Alexis: We traveled to Costa Rica on vacation a few years ago; we treated ourselves to a trip each year to somewhere that had warm weather. Arenal, Costa Rica, was the first place we traveled to, and we loved it. There, we did the touristy stuff – white water rafting, zip lining, the hot springs.

(Arenal is in the mountainous volcano region of Costa Rica, and boasts its very own volcano, which is still active! It includes one of the most visited national parks in Costa Rica, which is a big tourist draw to the country.)

JuliAnne: What do you and Leo do for a living here in Costa Rica, Alexis?

Alexis:  We are full time retirees.  In the past, my husband Leo was a commodities trader and I was a certified financial planner and coach. I had my own businesses for quite a few of the last several years.

How did you choose Costa Rica for retirement?

JuliAnne: How did you decide to move to Costa Rica for retirement?

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Alexis shot this photo herself from their home in Ojochal, Costa Rica.

Alexis: We were not completely sold on moving abroad, to be honest. We considered a lot of areas – both Stateside and international before we chose Costa Rica.

JuliAnne: What areas in the United States did you consider?

Alexis: In the U.S., we had researched Florida quite a bit, and some areas in California. Because I have asthma, I feel better in a more humid, temperate climate. That was a plus for Florida. California fell off our list because of cost of living considerations. Many areas in the U.S. that have beach frontage or access are very pricey. We also looked at Hawaii and Washington.

JuliAnne: What countries did you consider outside the U.S.?

Alexis: Other than Costa Rica, we looked at Jamaica, Ecuador, Panama and Puerto Rico.

JuliAnne: How did those weigh out against Costa Rica as you did your research?

Alexis: We could not find a lot online about Ecuador really; there did not seem to be a strong presence of expats living in Ecuador that had community groups online or anything like that. Nor did there seem to be much online about expat experiences in Ecuador. That was a bit of a concern for us. We got married in Jamaica, and love the people there and the chill vibe, but once we looked into it further, weren’t comfortable with living on such a small island. Safety was also a concern for Jamaica. Though we visited Panama – that country did not feel right either. I’m not sure if this was due to the strong American influence we observed there, or because of the safety issues (we heard about). Puerto Rico was going through a financial crisis when we looked at it, so we decided to cut it from the list for that reason.

Researching Costa Rica prior to moving

JuliAnne: What kind of research did you do about Costa Rica as a place to live and retire?

Alexis: We read two or three books from Amazon on retiring to Costa Rica. We read a blog from one of the books, Happier Than a Billionaire: Quitting My Job, Moving to Costa Rica, and Living the Zero Hour Work Week and we followed that author for a while. The books had a lot of links, which we also explored. We also looked at the U.S. Embassy’s page for Costa Rica.

JuliAnne: What were the top three reasons you decided to move to Costa Rica, versus all of those other places?

Alexis:  Costa Rica was said to be very peaceful – that resonated with us; we liked the fact that the country does not have a standing army. Second, we love the climate in Costa Rica. As I said, I have asthma and I do better in a temperate, humid environment. Costa Rica offers both. Access to the ocean was also very important for us, especially me, and we wanted to be close to nature. Finally, we were looking for a small type of community in which to settle – one that was not too over developed and Costa Rica seemed to have quite a few of those.

Falling in Love with Costa Rica’s Costa Ballena region

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Alexis is seated here on one of Costa Ballena’s gorgeous beaches. How does it get any better?

JuliAnne: So, now here you are settled in Costa Ballena along Costa Rica’s South Pacific coast.

While in the past a lot of retirees were choosing Guanacaste and Papagayo, Costa Ballena has risen in the past couple of years as an attractive option for retirees. Did you take a look at other areas inside Costa Rica before deciding that this was your preference or were you convinced that the South Pacific was where you wanted to be, as soon as you visited?

Alexis: When we left to go back to Minnesota after our third trip to Costa Rica, we felt like Costa Ballena was a strong option. The tipping point for moving here was us being able to sell our home in Minnesota before we could take the leap.

JuliAnne: What specifically drew you to the Costa Ballena region?

Alexis: I love water, so that was the biggest draw for me, since we are right on the South Pacific coast of Costa Rica. (Editor’s Note: The Ballena Coast has numerous beaches for surfing, paddle boarding, walking and camping, some of which have been reported to be among the country’s prettiest.)

Because Leo, my husband, and I liked this area so much, we came two more times over a three-year period to the Ballena Coast. Between the second and third visit, we had researched other places besides this area here in Costa Rica that we might also want to consider.

We did a lot of research on the Central Valley of Costa Rica – cost of living and so forth, and we looked into Guanacaste online. In the Central Pacific, we looked at Jaco, which is a big town but it did not speak to us at all.

Your Choices for Moving to Costa Ballena: Uvita, Dominical or Ojochal?

JuliAnne: Did you look at other towns here in Costa Ballena, other than Ojochal?

Alexis: In this area, we had looked at Dominical and Uvita.  I originally thought that because of my yoga interest that perhaps Dominical would be good for me, but I did not feel a connection there. Dominical is home to more of a hippy, surfer crowd.

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Even Alexis’ mutt enjoys yoga! It helps when mom teaches…

When we checked out Uvita, we found there were a lot of other Minnesotans there. But, the housing there seemed to be more expensive.

When we drove South to Ojochal, where we live now, we liked the people we met here; they were very down to earth. We met Canadians, some Coloradans – everyone was really nice. One of the realtors we met also had asthma like me so it was nice to compare notes with someone who had similar health concerns.

JuliAnne: So, once you found Ojochal, was your mind made up after seeing some homes in the area?

Alexis: On our final visit before we moved, we joined the Ojochal Community Page on Facebook, which allowed us to see what was going on day-to-day down here prior to making that final decision.

We tried to put ourselves in the situations we read about, what we would be doing day to day. I also reached out to people online through the community page and asked about yoga and teaching yoga and people seemed to be very interested in having a new teacher in town.

JuliAnne: I have to say, Alexis, it does sound like you and Leo really did your homework. I often hear very different stories from other expats who fell in love but did not look go to the lengths that you all did in terms of finding out what it was going to be like day to day before they picked up and moved. That’s great.

Alexis: We’re big on research (giggling). Before we purchased our first home together many years ago, we looked at 50 homes before we made an offer. So, yes, we are meticulous. As we did the research on all the areas we looked at for retirement, my husband would play devil’s advocate on everything and I would find the positive aspects.

Based on all the time we took and the homework we did, we do feel like we picked the right place.

Building a House in Costa Rica

JuliAnne: You and Leo have built a home here in Ojochal, correct?

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Alexis and Leo moved to Costa Rica in 2015 to retire.

Alexis: Yes. We moved to Ojochal and rented for about nine months while our home was being constructed.

JuliAnne: I hear so many complaints from expats in Costa Rica about the construction process locally. I believe some of that is due to people not understanding the cultural differences in work ethic and processes here along the coast. Could you run me through the timeline of when you moved here, when you bought your lot and how long building your home took? I think a lot of people considering Costa Rica would be interested in hearing that.

Alexis: We moved down here on June 1, 2015. We purchased our lot in August that same year. Then, we started construction on our house in October, just two months later.

JuliAnne: That’s actually a pretty quick timeline! How long did your overall construction take, start to finish?

Alexis: It only took five months. We moved in on March 1 of 2016.

JuliAnne: Wow! That’s much faster than most people I hear from. Granted your home is a modest size versus some of the others in this market, but was that the timeline that your builder had promised you?

Alexis: The contractor had promised three months, and it took five, so that’s not too bad.

Retirement in Costa Rica: What’s it like day to day?

JuliAnne: Well, congratulations on reaching retirement and finding your paradise here in the tropics! Many people are interested in retiring earlier and earlier these days. How do you and Leo find that you spend your time differently, now that you are retired?

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Retiring in Costa Rica is not all sunsets and cocktails…but you do get a few!

Alexis: We always wanted to work with the community as retirees. There are community groups here that we’re getting involved with, as time goes by, and we’re enjoying that.

With the acreage we have – our lot is three acres, we are pretty busy caring for our land. Plus, as you know, I teach yoga.

JuliAnne: Some retirees tell me that once they move to Costa Rica, they get bored. Have you found yourself bored since you’ve been here? The Costa Ballena community is very small.

Alexis: No. I have not felt like there was a moment that I didn’t have enough to do, since we’ve been here. On our land alone, we’ve planted 150 fruit trees in the past nine months, as well as a ton of flowers and pineapple plants. Plus, we’ve recently put in a new nursey. We plan to grow our own food, at least vegetables and herbs.

JuliAnne: Wow, you guys are busy! That’s great. Are you guys completely off the municipal grid up here, since you’re pretty far up the mountainside?

Alexis: No, we’re not, though we like the idea of being as sustainable as possible. Our new house is solar powered, however, with a back-up to the electrical company.

And there’s more to come…

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More from Alexis in this exclusive chat about what her retirement to Costa Rica has been like…next week!

Alexis talks shares further about retirement in Costa Rica in our next segment, which will come out next week. Stay tuned for more on:

  • Making social connections when you live on the coast,
  • Teaching yoga, and
  • The surprises she didn’t expect before they moved abroad to Costa Rica.

For more about Alexis and her style of yoga, visit her website.

Interested in buying your own piece of Costa Rica Real Estate in South Pacific Costa Rica?

We are licensed, legal REALTORS in Costa Rica, and we can help. Click here.

Want to know more about what living in Costa Rica is really like from a nine-year expat?

You’ve found the right place! You can read more about me, JuliAnne Murphy, my bestselling books about moving to Panama, and more on my full-time life in Costa Rica by clicking around on these links. If you’d like to hear from some other expats in Costa Rica, check out my recent chat with Enzo from Italy who owns a thriving boutique hotel and Italian restaurant, as well as some others I’ve spoken with on my Panama Gringo Guide blog here.

Pura Vida, and see you next week, right here, with more from Alexis!

Mistakes people make when they move to Costa Rica

We’ve all done it. You come to Costa Rica and you’re in your perfect world – ne’er a worry vacation mode – and you fall in love. I did.

Most Costa Rica expats will attest to the things I’m going to share with you here. Most new expats moving to Costa Rica make a number of mistakes and/or assumptions about this country and/or their future life here that can be quite detrimental to their future happiness and success.

What mistakes do people make when they move to Costa Rica?

Mistake #1: People assume Costa Rica is cheap.

Twenty years ago, Costa Rica was cheap. Maybe even ten years ago. But Costa Rica today – in 2016 – is no longer cheap, people! Is it more affordable than where you came from? Well, that really all depends. If you’re used to living in Manhattan or Chicago, then yes, it may be cheaper for you. But if you’re from Idaho or Arkansas, it probably will not be cheaper from your perspective.

Recommendation: Check out all the other blogs by Costa Rica expats that provide REAL cost of living calculators and comparisons. Do your homework. Consider each one of their perspectives – where did they move from? What kind of lifestyle do they have? At the moment, you can pretty much find an array of soup to nuts on the cost of living topic related to this country.

Bottom line for my monthly expenses for living in Costa Rica versus my former life as a Panama expat? It’s about equal. But here’s the kicker – in Panama, I lived in a brand new condo in a brand new neighborhood. Here in Costa Rica, I choose to live four hours outside the capitol city on the Pacific coast – in the smack middle of nowhere.

Traditional Costa Rican home with ox and cart
Traditional Costa Rican home with ox and cart

Which brings me to another point – Panama is not cheap either. That ship sailed right out of the Panama Canal about 5-6 years ago, when I lived there. Yes, there are things between the two countries that vary, but hear me when I say this, people:

Neither Costa Rica or Panama is cheap!

(For more specifics on a supermarket comparison between Panama and Costa Rica I did a few weeks ago, click here.)

Mistake #2: People assume finding work in Costa Rica will be easy.

I see this trend here in Costa Rica significantly more often than I did in Panama, and I suppose it’s because Costa Rica has a long-standing reputation of being a tropical paradise. Many people come, fall in love, think “I want that! I’m going to leave it all behind and move here” and then, they leave their brains at the border. But as my partner says (almost daily), “This is paradise, but it ain’t perfect.”

First of all, future Costa Rica expats, this country is NOT a country with a lot of industry, unless you count government workers, high technology (in the city, not here on the coast), agriculture and tourism. And, I can tell you right now, you’re not going to get hired in government as a foreigner unless you are specifically relocated here by your own Embassy. You may find something in high tech but those jobs, when available, pay Costa Rica wages – not what you’re accustomed to back home.

As for agri and tourism, same thing. Most of the time, even when a high-rolling foreign investor comes to Costa Rica and buys a hotel, they’re more interested in keeping the Tico employees because they cost less.

Best-selling author JuliAnne Murphy Expat Costa Rica unemployed man

Every single week I hear of another expat who has returned ‘back home’ after they realized they had no way to support themselves. The moral to the story is – yes, there’s room for you in Costa Rica, but don’t plan on finding a job here. They are few and far between. And if you do find a job, it will pay 50-250% less than your job back home. My recommendation, unless you choose to wait tables: bring your own ideas and money to start your own business, or work online. But, somehow HAVE A PLAN that is sustainable to support yourself beyond 3-6 months.

Mistake #3: People assume their savings will go further than it does.

Bottom line: refer to #1 above. So many people move here – and travel here, as well – assuming that Costa Rica is like Mexico 30 years ago.

Those are the people who read too many International Living articles. I, for one, get sick of hearing expats bitch about how expensive it is to live here. YOU are the one who chose to move here, and if YOU did not have a plan or do your homework, whose fault is that? Oh, right! Yours.

A Recap: Three Real-World Facts about Living in Costa Rica

I’ll make this simple. 🙂

  1. Costa Rica is not cheap. And in some cases, it’s the most expensive country in Central America in which to live. So before you plan to move here, do some homework and figure out what YOUR cost of living will really be. Then, add 20% (on an annual basis). Just to be safe. 🙂
  2. Your long-term success for living in Costa Rica is directly tied to your ability to support yourself. And, the options to generate income based on the current landscape of available jobs in Costa Rica (especially along the coast) are very limited. So, have a plan that’s sustainable before you quit your job and buy your plane ticket.
  3. In my opinion, if you choose to move to Costa Rica (or retire in Costa Rica), you should have a minimum of six months living expenses in the bank before you come. And, if you plan to build a house in Costa Rica, take whatever quote you get for the house, and add at least 20%. Trust me. True for Expats, too!

Coming straight from the jungle, that’s it for today’s Costa Rica recap!

Moving to Costa Rica? We can help you find your piece of tropical Costa Rica Real Estate in Southern Pacific Costa Rica.

We are licensed real estate brokers (and REALTORS) in Costa Rica. Click here for more properties in South Pacific Costa Rica.

Pura Vida!